Evergreen, Colorado

High Altitude Illness is a general term used to describe diseases that affect the normal functioning of the lungs and bronchi. Symptoms include: Headaches, Chest Pain, Feeling Sick/Exhausted, Dizziness, Uncontrollable Sweating, Difficulty in Breathing and Shortness of Breath. It can sometimes take days for the body to adjust to high altitude. High altitude can also occur at elevations above 8,000 feet. Avoid driving on mountain roads and the airport if you are a frequent flyer.

Tips for Adjusting to High Altitude in the Colorado Mountains and Foothills: How to Avoid or Manage High Altitude Illness

One thing people don’t think about is adjusting to high altitudes when moving or vacationing at higher elevations in Colorado Mountains and Denver Foothills. When people come from lower altitudes it often takes their body time to adjust to higher elevations. It usually isn’t dangerous and just uncomfortable. Headaches, fatigue and shortness of breath.

Working at high altitude

Although most people think of work related issues, people do work or vacation at altitude. Usually, if your work isn’t physically strenuous you don’t need to do anything special. Exercises can help. But if you do have a job that involves heavy lifting you might need to exercise in the gym at higher altitude. Usually, if you work at an office job, then you should avoid driving on the mountain roads and the airport (I would suggest staying away from the airport for a while if you are a frequent flyer). Getting a sports medicine check-up The best way to get a sports medicine check up is by visiting your primary care doctor. Sometimes, if your primary care doctor is busy, you may need to wait for their call back and they might not be able to see you for awhile.

Moving to Higher Altitudes

You will need to increase the elevation in your home to approximately 1,600 feet to get your heart rate down from your base level. If you have heart disease it might be a good idea to stay lower. Either way, reduce your intake of sodium (salt) and avoid eating anything fried. You might want to try a small scoop of blood pressure medicine (prescription or over the counter) before starting to climb up. Increased salt makes your heart work harder, which can raise your blood pressure. Over time, even a little elevation change can raise your blood pressure, causing what is called reverse hypertension. Low sodium and fried foods can also make you gain weight, causing bloating and feeling tired. Sudden weight gain can lead to fluid retention that can be a major health risk.

Vacationing at Higher Altiudes

Tips for Acclimating to Higher Elevations: How to Get Through the Newness & Tiringness Whether you are heading to a hotel in Pueblo or an apartment in Denver. It takes a little planning. It’s very common to spend a week or more in higher elevations trying to acclimatize and then having to come back down. Most people are able to adjust to high elevations if they spend time in these areas. Section 1.3 High Altitude Illness & Illnesses in the Colorado Mountains High Altitude Illness (HAI) is a general term used to describe diseases that affect the normal functioning of the lungs and bronchi. It is characterized by feeling short of breath or having a cough. HAI is often symptomless and many people with these diseases do not feel ill when they are at sea level.

Living in the Denver Foothills. Will the altitude impact your life?

Life at High Altitudes. A few tips to manage altitude sickness.

High Altitude Illness

It may not be a problem for some people, but it can be for others. High altitude usually refers to altitudes above 7,000 feet, but it is calculated with your starting altitude and not necessarily with the altitude at which you move from. High altitude can also occur at elevations above 8,000 feet. Symptoms include: Headaches, Chest Pain, Feeling Sick/Exhausted, Dizziness, Uncontrollable Sweating, Difficulty in Breathing and Shortness of Breath. It can sometimes take days for the body to adjust to high altitude. Precautions to Follow If you live at high altitude, be sure to stay indoors during the night if possible. This will minimize the chance of catching a cold or a virus. If you live at higher elevations, staying indoors at night is advisable for maximum protection.

How to Avoid or Manage High Altitude Illness

Regular breathing exercises Take cold showers or baths Walk uphill several times a day Use salt tablets to absorb salt from your urine Drink plenty of water and keep it topped up Consider avoiding alcohol while in high altitude Eat fruits, vegetables and healthy fats Use albuterol, an inhaled corticosteroid that relieves bronchospasms (shortness of breath) caused by high altitude, to aid breathing.

The Basics of Making Pre-Travel Plans

Book your hotel and flights early. Set up your fitness and eating plans early. Get as much rest as you can. Get plenty of water, keep your caffeine consumption low and take plenty of breaks. Bring warm, waterproof layers to protect you from the cold wind and be sure to dress in layers to be able to take off layers as needed. Winter clothing will provide warmth in the morning while you’re hiking, but the sun rises at around 9 AM and the wind chills are near zero in the mornings. Wear as many layers of clothing as you think you’ll need and bring a sweater and a buff for the mornings or evenings. Be careful not to overdo your hiking in the mountains, for example, pushing your body beyond it’s capacity.

Preventing Exercise-Induced High Altitude Illness (EIA)

Whenever exercising, it’s important to start slowly if you are going to take on altitude. We recommend at least 15 minutes per hour. It’s important to avoid extreme high-intensity exercise that causes the blood vessels in your lungs and head to constrict. This puts you at a higher risk for damage. High-altitude sickness is usually diagnosed at altitudes above 8,000 feet. People who exercise at a higher elevation are more prone to the flu-like symptoms of low-oxygen and blood pressure drop. These symptoms can often be managed by maintaining a high-protein, low-sugar diet, reducing salt and alcohol, and taking electrolytes such as electrolyte tablets or drinks.

Preventing and Managing the Symptoms of EIA

The main cause of altitude sickness is what’s called a “challenge stimulus”. It happens when the body experiences an exogenous challenge, like a prolonged period of time at a high altitude. Take the following steps to manage and prevent symptoms of altitude sickness: Find a Well-Hosted Hotel Having a well-hosted hotel and any other recommendations from friends, neighbors or friends of friends is often very helpful in preventing altitude illness and providing relief. Know your Physical Exertion Limits You will need to pace yourself or take frequent breaks if you don’t have those at your destination, especially if your altimeter is reading high. Make sure to follow the physical activity recommendations from your doctor or altitude specialist.

Avoidance, Prevention, & Managing High Altitudes During Travel and Work in the Rocky Mountains Subsection  Limiting Exposure to Outdoor Environmental Factors that May Induce EIA during Travel and Work in the Rocky Mountains Subsection  Preventing or Managing Exercise-Induced Airway

Insufficient Dehydration & Dehydration Related Coughing and Dry throat can be one of the most common early signs of an ascending IEA. Keeping adequate liquids in the body with electrolyte drinks or general purpose IV fluids can help prevent dehydration. Workplace Health In Colorado Subsection  Symptoms of High Altitude Illness & How to Manage Symptoms Subsection  Symptoms of High Altitude Illness during Travel & Work in the Rocky Mountains Subsection.

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